thingsorganizedneatly:

Traditional tools used at the North American Institute of Swiss Watchmaking, in Forth Worth.
Mark Mahaney for the New York Times

thingsorganizedneatly:

Traditional tools used at the North American Institute of Swiss Watchmaking, in Forth Worth.

Mark Mahaney for the New York Times

afootballreport:

The Oldest Footballer in England

Meet Dickie Borthwick. He’s approaching 79, and still plays football.

Beyond the immediate desire to want to kick around with him, this short film by Alex Knowles & James Callum focuses on a man who has been fortunate enough to share his whole life with the game. They made the film with the intent to dispel the myth that ‘old people are past it’ and instead introduce us to inspirational people with invaluable insight, exceptional passion, a never-ending supply of wonderful stories and a thirst for life that refuses to fade.

Mr. Borthwick notes that "football brings a lot of friends into your life… I’m there with young people all the time, playing football! At my age! What more can I ask for?" Cheers, Dickie, for reminding us to appreciate what we all have at our feet.

Read More

Steady Steve Bruce is too good for the chaos at Newcastle

I am a huge Steve Bruce fan, and I think that his detractors (when he was a player or as a manager) ascribe some sort of moral and intellectual fault to him due to his friendly and portly image. Newcastle United is a disaster zone, and I hope that Steve Bruce keeps his toes out of it for a while. Particularly because of the team he has built at Hull. I watched the match against West Ham on Monday, and I must say he seems perfect for the club atmosphere, the players, everything. 

mapsontheweb:

Number of U.S. men’s national soccer team home matches, by state

Vector version - Source: Wikipedia

mapsontheweb:

Number of U.S. men’s national soccer team home matches, by state

explorationimages:

MESSENGER: "Staring at the Sea, Staring at the Sand" (September 8th 2014)

Of Interest: The smooth, rolling terrain in this high resolution image looks almost like sand dunes or ripples on a beach. The smooth texture of this region is due to a blanket of pyroclastic material from the volcanic vent located about 85 km to the south of it. To put the size of this image into perspective, a human could run the length of this image in less than an hour (if they could breathe on Mercury, that is!).

This image was acquired as part of the MDIS low-altitude imaging campaign. During MESSENGER’s second extended mission, the spacecraft makes a progressively closer approach to Mercury’s surface than at any previous point in the mission, enabling the acquisition of high-spatial-resolution data. For spacecraft altitudes below 350 kilometers, NAC images are acquired with pixel scales ranging from 20 meters to as little as 2 meters.

The MESSENGER spacecraft is the first ever to orbit the planet Mercury, and the spacecraft’s seven scientific instruments and radio science investigation are unraveling the history and evolution of the Solar System’s innermost planet. During the first two years of orbital operations, MESSENGER acquired over 150,000 images and extensive other data sets. MESSENGER is capable of continuing orbital operations until early 2015.

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington

explorationimages:

MESSENGER: "Staring at the Sea, Staring at the Sand" (September 8th 2014)

Of Interest: The smooth, rolling terrain in this high resolution image looks almost like sand dunes or ripples on a beach. The smooth texture of this region is due to a blanket of pyroclastic material from the volcanic vent located about 85 km to the south of it. To put the size of this image into perspective, a human could run the length of this image in less than an hour (if they could breathe on Mercury, that is!).

This image was acquired as part of the MDIS low-altitude imaging campaign. During MESSENGER’s second extended mission, the spacecraft makes a progressively closer approach to Mercury’s surface than at any previous point in the mission, enabling the acquisition of high-spatial-resolution data. For spacecraft altitudes below 350 kilometers, NAC images are acquired with pixel scales ranging from 20 meters to as little as 2 meters.

The MESSENGER spacecraft is the first ever to orbit the planet Mercury, and the spacecraft’s seven scientific instruments and radio science investigation are unraveling the history and evolution of the Solar System’s innermost planet. During the first two years of orbital operations, MESSENGER acquired over 150,000 images and extensive other data sets. MESSENGER is capable of continuing orbital operations until early 2015.
Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington

Remember a couple days ago when I was waxing (would never dream of it Roy) about Roy Keane’s beard? Well, an aston villa fan has photoshopped the beard onto each player. This is the link I saw: http://www.whoateallthepies.tv/aston_villa/199560/ever-wondered-what-aston-villas-entire-squad-would-look-like-with-roy-keanes-beard.html

And its done by twitter photoshopper @GarethRDR

(these are not my images, I’m just reposting them with the link)

for-all-mankind:

canadian-space-agency:

NASA Astronaut Reid Wiseman aboard the ISS: “SpaceVine timelapse - @astro_alex (ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst) worked the arm and I pushed the “so long” button on Cygnus.”

Credit: Reid Wiseman/NASA

This is perhaps one of my all-time favourite videos/gifs. It shows how gracefully space flying is, and how Cygnus’ orbit takes it away from the space station. Complex orbital mechanics demonstrated beautifully.

(Source: vine.co)

mapsontheweb:

Teen Birth Rates From 1990-2013 By US State

mapsontheweb:

Teen Birth Rates From 1990-2013 By US State